What do you do with a business card 1: using your own business card?

Having written a post about the way in which the design of your business card can affect its usefulness I have been asked to write a further piece about what you do with business cards. This has two elements – what you, as the owner of the business card, uses if for, and what the person who receives it does with it! I have decided to do this in 2 parts starting with:

What do you do with your own business card?

Image courtesy of jscreationzs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of jscreationzs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

If you don’t have your business cards with you and use them effectively you are closing down one of your communication routes.          

1.  Take them with you wherever you go

You never know when you will need it. I have lost count of the number of times when someone I know is talking to someone else in a social situation and says ‘get in touch with me’  and then writes out their email or phone number. DON’T  do this – use your business card – it has it all written on there, and you never know if they see the card they might know of someone who could need your services. Even if this is not your personal email address they can still contact you – or you can write your personal email or number on the back.  

 2. Have your cards somewhere where you can get at them easily. 

If you wear a jacket with pockets keep some of your cards in one of your pockets so that you can quickly get it out. If you don’t have pockets keep them in a box or holder that you can easily spot in your bag. If you are going to a professional meeting – especially a networking meeting hold a few in your hand for ease of access. It does not give a good professional image if you are scrabbling round in a bag for your business cards when you are at a networking meeting. Keep some in every bag you use so that you always have them with you.

3. Give them out to people They don’t do you any good unless they are circulating.

 If you have any additional pointers for the effective use of your own business card please comment below.

Business Cards

I don’t know about you, but I have looked at a lot of business cards in my time, especially since I have started the Admin Angel element of my business. One of the roles that I offer to businesses is to populate spreadsheets with information from the business cards they have collected while networking. This is a useful way of collecting the data in one place to use when referring your contacts to each other, and to use as the basis of any mailing or information sheets you may decide to do for your business.

But – and this is a big but – you don’t always get the information you need from the business cards you receive.

What do you do?

I don’t have the benefit of having met many of the people whose business cards I am using to garner the information and I regularly cannot tell what business the person is in who has given out the card. Even if the business area is obvious – what is the Unique Selling Point (USP)? Sometimes I have met the person that has given the card, but I cannot always remember them as I do a lot of networking, as do the people whose cards I am collating.

Contact Information

I am amazed at how often business cards do not have basic contact information on them – like a phone number, email or website. How are the people you have met going to contact you if you don’t include this information? Quite often there is 1 or 2 of the 3 elements I have listed, but I personally feel that you need all 3 to be an effective business. Different clients have different preferred ways of contacting their potential business providers and by closing down any of the routes listed above you are not helping your business to grow.

Some cards do not have the name of the person who has handed it out – only the business they are representing. This will not help with future contacts and does not help you to work out who is being effective in getting additional trade for your business.

Additional Information

In these days of online networking it is also a good idea to include your online networking links, any of which could act as your website if you feel you cannot afford one yet, or don’t have the time to maintain more than one online presence. You have a range of potential sites – Facebook, Linked In, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest to name a few that I have used. I wouldn’t recommend listing all of them on your card as you would need an A4 sheet and it would be overwhelming. My next post will be on my observations about the benefits of different kinds of social media for different types of businesses.

Legibility

Some business cards look beautiful and very fancy, but finding, and reading, the information on them can be very difficult. So please, please think about the legibility of the print – size and the contrasts between the colour of the print and the back ground are very important. Make sure that the key contact information and name stand out in particular.

The other element of legibility is how cluttered the business card is – so be selective, but make sure that the card links to other potential sources of information.

Any other points?

I have heard lots of comments about using both sides of the card – this is great to get more information across but leave some space for a note to be written on the card as many people, myself included, like to make a note of where I have collected each business card. This helps me to see which networking groups are getting me the best contacts, but it also acts as a memory jogger if I am trying to remember more about the person who gave me the card.

Using colour or a distinctive shape to make your card stand out. A good idea, but remember that people who collect business cards will often store them in a business card box if yours doesn’t fit it could get lost. Also don’t let the colour or design take away from legibility or the information you are trying to pass on ( see my other points above).

I know my businessIMG_0689 cards are not perfect, and I will definitely be redesigning the Business Consultant one in the future as my business has developed and changed since I designed these. In the interests of openness, though I thought it a good idea to share my own cards so you can critique them too.

 

 

 

Communication, communication, communication

This post has been inspired by my reflections on my experiences with a range of projects in the past which has confirmed to me the importance of communication in ensuring whether a project is successful or not. I thought it might be helpful to bring these together in a single summary as communication is so important.

When dealing with a major change programme it will be very rare to get all of the communication right – but it is extremely easy to get it completely wrong. My personal definitions of getting it wrong are:

  1. only sharing information with an ‘inner circle’ of the great and the good and then expecting the other people who are affected by the changes to just take it without complaint.
  2. giving out information only when there is something significant to say or a big change happening – the rumour mill will take over as communication will happen whether you want it to or not. People will always want to know what is happening so if you don’t tell them (even if all you are saying is ‘there is nothing to say’ they will fill the void.
  3. limiting the information that is given out to very bland or basic statements – it is important to be as open and honest as you can be (although there will always be sensitive items they need to be shared with the people affected as soon as possible, confidentially if necessary).
  4. giving out information on an irregular basis so people never know when they are likely to find out what is happening next.
  5. giving different messages to different people – so that when they compare what is said they do not believe any of what they have been told even if the messages are correct and have just been expressed in different ways.
  6. missing significant groups of people out of the whole communication process.
  7. only putting the information into a single format that not everyone can access (like the filing cabinet in the basement in “Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy” by Douglas Adams.

I have shared my reflections on better ways of communicating in a range of previous posts:

In summary the ways in which you can ensure that communication is a positive force in the work you do are to:

  1. have a clear communication plan which is agreed and signed up to by all partners
  2. include all of the people who are to be communicated with
  3. include all of the ways in which the communication will be handled
  4. make the dissemination routes for the information as wide and inclusive as possible
  5. have a clear timetable for communication – never less than once a month – and keep to it. It can change at different times in the project and may come down to once a day at significant points
  6. agree the wording that is going to be used – either in advance in the communication plan or, if it is something that has to be done quickly agree who will have the responsibility for composing the communication to be used.
  7. be consistent

What have I missed? I would be interested to hear your experiences of communication in your work life. If you would like to do a guest post please get in touch.